Reflective practice and lifelong learning

The book is rich in practical wisdom, concisely expressed, and will enable both experienced teachers and new entrants to use reflective practice to improve and develop teaching and learning in a complex and diverse lifelong learning sector. The authors highlight its value for improving teaching and learning and coping with ongoing change, whilst recognising honestly the difficulties in making time to reflect deeply and critically and the questions raised about the worth of reflective practice in an increasingly regulated sector. Rich examples bring the text to life, exemplify concepts and demonstrate practical applications. It is written in a refreshingly straightforward way that steers clear of educational jargon and aims for clarity; it is an antidote to the over-theorizing of Reflective Practice that it warns against.

Reflective practice and lifelong learning

Key messages To meet the new demands of their profession and keep up their expertise, veterinarians need to engage in lifelong learning LLL. Competencies needed for LLL relate to autonomous self-directed learning and to learning in social interaction. Here, teachers should provide adequate student mentorship.

Epistemological beliefs are highly relevant for the way students learn, teachers teach, and professionals keep on learning.

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To become effective lifelong learners, veterinary students have to have control over and feel responsible for their learning experiences and outcomes, during the curriculum and afterward. Introduction The work of veterinarians has changed tremendously in recent decades and will be subject to change in the future.

To meet the new demands of their profession and keep up their expertise, veterinarians need to engage in continuing professional development CPD and use opportunities for lifelong learning LLLboth formal and informal Larkin, ; Lee, ; Laal and Salamati, Lifelong learning leads to an enriching life of self-fulfillment and is positively related to mental wellbeing in veterinarians Laal and Salamati, ; Mastenbroek et al.

Learning will need to take place on an ongoing basis, individually and in interaction with others Dale, Pierce, and May, Therefore, not surprisingly, preparation for LLL is — and has been see Box Preparing for Lifelong Learning Lifelong learning is not easy for professionals such as veterinarians, and they experience different barriers to participation in CPD Reflective practice and lifelong learning Groot et al.

Thus, veterinary professionals ought to become aware of the importance of LLL from the start of their education. They need to acquire the knowledge, the attitudes, and the skills necessary for development of their LLL competencies after graduation.

To ensure that veterinarians will be involved in LLL, some people focus on accreditation of formal CPD May, ; Caple,but we will focus on competencies for and beliefs about LLL, following the advice of Stephen Billett not to confuse lifelong learning with lifelong teaching Billett, In this chapter we will explore what competencies veterinarians need for LLL on their own and with others, consider how to develop these during the curriculum, and propose strategies to enhance learning beyond veterinary curricula.

Many competencies necessary for LLL have been described, from which we will address the following two categories: It is not only a cognitive, individual, and internalized activity, but also highly social de Groot et al. Therefore, reflective practice asks for learning conversations that are critical through the exploration of options, assumptions, and evidence de Groot et al.

The Science of Learning

In discussing individual learning and learning in social interaction, we align with two major perspectives on learning: For reflective practice, veterinarians need competencies in self-directed learning SDL.

SDL is necessary to construct knowledge on your own and collaboratively at the workplace. Veterinary schools should help students to become self-directed learners. Focus on epistemology Epistemological beliefs influence knowledge-sharing at work and learning at school, and may have the following dimensions Hofer and Pintrich, Whether knowledge is certain — absolute to tentative How knowledge is structured — simple to complex What is the best source of knowledge — handed down by authorities to derived by reason Whether knowledge is under your own control — you are born with a certain ability to learn to your ability to learn can be changed With what speed knowledge is acquired — quickly or not at all to gradually Individual Learning Self-Directed Learning Knowlesp.

Self-directed learning clearly provides a crucial role for the learner at the outset of the learning task Loyens, Magda, and Rikers, How to Become a Self-Directed Learner Readiness to Learn Students entering veterinary education will differ in the way they learn, which depends largely on characteristics such as intelligence, personality, and former learning experiences, but also on their — often implicit — beliefs about knowledge and knowing personal epistemology; Hofer and Pintrich, Such beliefs drive behaviors.

It makes all the difference to learning whether see Box Students engaging in SDL should be aware of their own epistemological beliefs, and how these beliefs influence their learning. Since not all students entering a course will be familiar with the concepts of SDL and reflective practice, these concepts require explicit explanation regarding their meaning, the competencies required, and how they can be learned.

Various skills and attitudes toward learning are required for successful SDL, for example the abilities to: However, most of all students require an adequate self-concept as a nondependent and self-directed person.

Learning Objectives Learning objectives are motivating, especially for learners with a goal-oriented learning orientation Teunissen and Bok, Learning objectives direct learning activities; achieving objectives is perceived as a successful learning experience that raises self-efficacy.

Reflective practice and lifelong learning

Once learners have diagnosed their learning needs and translated these into learning objectives, they formalize them by making a personal development plan.

In formal training, the preparation of development plans is often a joint process between student and mentor. Engaging in the Learning Process Students need to understand themselves as learners in order to understand their needs as self-directed learners.May 28,  · Reflection and reflective practice in professional lifelong learning.

One of the earliest works on reflection, which has influenced many professions, is Schön’s ( Schön, D. A. The Reflective Practitioner: How Professionals Think in Action. EEB Reflective Practice and Lifelong Learning (8) This subject is designed for students who have successfully completed the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

The subject encourages a broader and deeper understanding of teaching and assessment practice through wider reading and critical assessments. EEB Reflective Practice and Lifelong Learning (8) This subject is designed for students who have successfully completed the Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

The subject encourages a broader and deeper understanding of teaching and assessment practice . Reflective practice is the ability to reflect on one's actions so as to engage in a process of continuous learning.

According to one definition it involves "paying critical attention to the practical values and theories which inform everyday actions, by examining practice reflectively and reflexively. Within this essay, the research will use Reflective Practice in a teaching experience.

It will focus on The Community College Whitstable and.

Published: Mon, 5 Dec Within this essay, the research will use Reflective Practice in a teaching experience. It will focus on The Community College Whitstable and .

Reflective Practice and Its Implications for Pharmacy Education